Five Minutes With - Mark Addy

Mark Addy
Mark Addy

HOW WAS IT TO BE BACK FOR SEASON 2?

It’s a slightly different show I think. They wrote season one for the Saturday tea-time slot, the Doctor Who audience, but it was on a bit later than that, and then the BBC decided it was going to stay in a later slot, so it needed to be written for that slightly different audience. I think it’s created a better show; it’s slightly more mature, it looks into things a bit deeper perhaps than series one did. And you could start watching series two without having seen series one, you’d still pick it up.

HAVE YOU AND YOUR CO-STARS DEVELOPED GREAT CAMARADERIE ON SET?

Yeah, we have a good time, which is useful if you’re doing something this long. You need to be able to do some messing about to be able to stay sane over that kind of time period. We spend seven months having breakfast, lunch and dinner together, as well as the working day, so you’ve got to get on and luckily we do.

WHAT HAS THE PUBLIC’S REACTION TO THE SHOW BEEN LIKE?

They like it a lot. There’s nothing else really like it, not that I’ve seen. You have to remember it’s a British show done on a BBC budget, so it has a huge ambition in terms of what it wants to be and how it looks, and they’ve managed to create it on a relatively low budget.

YOU HAD SOME EXCELLENT ADDITIONS TO THE CAST FOR THE SECOND SERIES. IS IT IMPORTANT TO KEEP FRESHENING THINGS UP?

Yeah, I think so. You’re telling stories that are expanding the whole time. That’s one of the joys for us as actors, we’ve got some tremendous guest stars coming in, and getting to work with them for a while is wonderful. It keeps it fresh for us and fresh for the audience.

300 STAR VINCENT REGAN IS ONE OF THOSE WHO CAME IN. ARE YOU INVOLVED IN HIS THEATRE IN EAST YORKSHIRE?

Not involved, but I was at the opening night. It’s a great little theatre, it really is. I don’t know quite how he managed to get it up and running at a time when everybody’s saving money left, right and centre.

DO YOU FANCY TREADING THE BOARDS THERE?

You never know, it’d be close to home! I could get home every night, which would make a change!

YOU FILMED THE BBC DRAMA REMEMBER ME LAST YEAR, WHICH MUST HAVE BEEN AN EASY COMMUTE FOR YOU

Yeah, that was good - Huddersfield and Scarborough. It’s not often you get to be at home when you’re working, so that was nice.

IT LOOKED AS IF IT WAS A GOOD PROJECT TO BE INVOLVED IN

Yeah, it was great. Yorkshire’s beautiful, and it was nice to see it looking so good on screen.

WHAT IS IT THAT YOU LOOK FOR IN A ROLE?

That’s an interesting question. I try to look for something that’s a little out of the ordinary really. The role in Remember Me, although he was a policeman, I thought that was the least important fact about him. He was a bloke who’d lost his family and his mojo, and he was on the verge of losing his marbles. But with Atlantis, they said, ‘We want you to play Hercules’ and I said, ‘Are you sure you’ve got the right person?’ But there’s more to him than you expect, and that’s what I like about it.

DO YOU HAVE ANY BURNING AMBITIONS?

Not really. I look for parts and scripts that interest me and are a little bit different, where I feel like I could bring something to that project in whatever way. It’s always interesting and they’re always different, that’s the nice thing. You’re learning something new all the time. As long as you keep on learning... if you don’t learn anything from it, it’s probably time to stop!

WHAT HAVE YOU GOT COMING UP IN 2015?

We’re waiting to see whether we’re doing more Atlantis yet. Hopefully we are because the series is heading forwards and it’ll be interesting to see where they go with it.

:: Atlantis series 2, part 1 is out now on DVD and Blu-ray