Get into the garden

A Generic Photo of a wet garden in summer. See PA Feature GARDENING Gardening Column. Picture credit should read: PA Photo/Thinkstockphotos. WARNING: This picture must only be used to accompany PA Feature GARDENING Gardening Column.
A Generic Photo of a wet garden in summer. See PA Feature GARDENING Gardening Column. Picture credit should read: PA Photo/Thinkstockphotos. WARNING: This picture must only be used to accompany PA Feature GARDENING Gardening Column.

If you’re looking outside and despairing at your soggy mass of potted petunias, drowning dahlias and other beleaguered bedding, there is light at the end of the tunnel

Yes, the cool, wet weather of June and July has battered plants and made us all miserable this summer, but the increased moisture in the ground could well lead to a floriferous autumn, according to garden designer Chris Beardshaw, a regular panellist on BBC Radio 4’s Gardeners’ Question Time.

“The good news is that there’s a lot of trees and shrubs and hedges which have benefited from the deluge,” says Beardshaw, who is a Cheshire’s Garden of Distinction ambassador and was an exhibitor at the recent show at RHS Tatton Park.

“Trees that had struggled with several dry springs and winters were starting to yellow early and suffer dieback in the crown and stunted growth. Now, they are very lush and there’s plenty of growth.

“I’ve got acers and limes in the garden that have put on more growth this year than I’ve ever seen.

“Deep-rooted, woody and resilient specimens that are used to the temperature variations that we’ve had will do well.”