Get into the garden

Undated Handout Photo of 'Sweet Love' (Peter Nyssen, Unwins). See PA Feature GARDENING Gardening Column. Picture credit should read: PA Photo/Which?. WARNING: This picture must only be used to accompany PA Feature GARDENING Gardening olumn.
Undated Handout Photo of 'Sweet Love' (Peter Nyssen, Unwins). See PA Feature GARDENING Gardening Column. Picture credit should read: PA Photo/Which?. WARNING: This picture must only be used to accompany PA Feature GARDENING Gardening olumn.

With a wide choice of spring bulbs now available in garden centres and from bulb specialists, it’s difficult to know which varieties to choose and is often tempting to stay with old favourites.

But there is a flurry of new bulbs worth trying, according to a trial of daffodils and tulips by Which? Gardening, the Consumers’ Association magazine, which also suggests that new varieties produce better results than some of the older types.

Trialists found that the new bulbs had a more regular height and consistent flowering time, giving an overall better display than the older ones.

Last autumn, trialists tested 53 new types of spring-flowering daffodils and tulips, growing them alongside five well-established varieties to use as a comparison. The bulbs were planted in early November, the narcissus twice their own depth and tulips three times their depth.

The bulbs had to withstand baking sun, high winds and torrential rain in spring.