Mayfield youngsters reap gardening benefits

Mayfield Y2K project - From left to right: Land Services chargehand Tam Finlay, James Kinch of Midlothian Council, John Reilly of Midlothian Gardening Services, Dave Reilly, Thomas Campbell,  Adam Kelly, and Land Services foreman Jim Ferguson.
Mayfield Y2K project - From left to right: Land Services chargehand Tam Finlay, James Kinch of Midlothian Council, John Reilly of Midlothian Gardening Services, Dave Reilly, Thomas Campbell, Adam Kelly, and Land Services foreman Jim Ferguson.

Working in partnership with the Mayfield and Easthouses Youth 2000 Project (Y2K) is reaping benefits not just for young people but also for the wider community.

Supervised by Midlothian Council’s Landscape and Countryside Service team, volunteers and young trainees from the Y2K are improving green spaces in the area by planting shrubs, clearing flower beds and reinstating kerbs.

The project, run by Y2K’s gardening social enterprise ‘Midlothian Gardening Services’, is funded with a grant of £7635 from the Lottery body Awards for All.

Adam Kelly (16), said he has been enjoying the training and work experience offered by the project.

Meanwhile David Reilly, 20, has already clocked up around 200 hours of volunteering, many of which was spent upgrading the park in Mayfield.

Adam, Dave and Billy work with John Reilly, who manages Midlothian Gardening Services and Thomas Campbell, an admin support worker with MGS.

Sharon Stoddart, of Y2K, said: “This partnership approach has not only offered benefits to the volunteers and trainees - Adam, Billy and David - but it has also provided John with support to complete his Horticulture Level three.

“Moving forward, Y2K would like to see more partnership working and the involvement of more local people to create attractive spaces in their local community.”

Councillor Bob Constable, cabinet member with responsibility for green spaces, said: “We all benefit from projects like this one.

“The young people get valuable work experience - which looks good on their CVs and hopefully helps them secure work in the future. They also learn new skills and get to work as a team.

“Meanwhile, we all get to enjoy the fruits of their labour so to speak when we get out into the local park.

“It’s a huge help to us as a council and to local residents.”

Set up in 2000, Y2K is a dedicated youth project providing a variety of opportunities for young people.