Penicuik pupils learn lessons to be lifesavers

Minister for Public Health Aileen Campbell attends a CPR training event at Beeslack High School attended by pupils from Beeslack and also from Mauricewood Primary 24/11/16
Minister for Public Health Aileen Campbell attends a CPR training event at Beeslack High School attended by pupils from Beeslack and also from Mauricewood Primary 24/11/16

More than 60,000 people across Scotland have been given life-saving CPR training in the last 12 months.

The initiative has been part of a national collaboration of more than a dozen organisations including emergency services, defence and third sector with the aim of improving the response to out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

The figure was published in a Scottish Government report reviewing progress in the first year of Scotland’s Out of Hospital Cardiac Arrest Strategy.

The five-year strategy aims to save 1,000 extra lives by 2020 and equip an additional half a million people in Scotland with CPR skills.

Minister for Public Health, Aileen Campbell, launched the review on a visit to Beeslack Community High School, Penicuik, last week where she joined P7 and S1 pupils in a CPR training session.

Ms Campbell said: “Each year in Scotland there are around 3,000 cardiac arrests out-of-hospital. Cardiac arrest is when a person’s heart completely stops and, if this happens, CPR must be administered within minutes or the person will likely die.

“That is why CPR training and education is so vitally important.

“Indeed we know that over three-quarters of people believe that everyone should be trained in CPR, although only half of people have had the training.

“Our strategy aims to equip as many people as possible with these life-saving skills as well as looking at how our healthcare and emergency services can support a rapid and effective response to out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

“Over the last year some very promising progress has been made. This is thanks, in no small part, to the great efforts of all of our partners involved in this work.

“We are now looking to build on these solid foundations going in to next year, with a focus in 2017 on raising awareness amongst young people about the importance of CPR.”

The report details a series of key results as well as setting out the priorities for 2017. The next phase will prioritise engaging with, and training young people in CPR as well as building links with communities that have disproportionately poorer outcomes.