Professor receives award for research

Professor David Argyle receives the International Prize from Mike Townsend (left), Chairman of the Kennel Club Charitable Trust and Vernon Hill (right), Founder of Metro Bank and the Hill Family Foundation. Photo: Geoff Caddick/PA Wire
Professor David Argyle receives the International Prize from Mike Townsend (left), Chairman of the Kennel Club Charitable Trust and Vernon Hill (right), Founder of Metro Bank and the Hill Family Foundation. Photo: Geoff Caddick/PA Wire

A scientist, deemed to be a leading light in the field of canine oncology, has been recognised for his role in transforming dog health.

Professor David Argyle, Head of the Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies at Edinburgh University, won the International Canine Heath award for his work in identifying stem cells in cancer.

By isolating and studying the cancer stem cells in dogs, Professor Argyle has transformed our understanding of how the cancer stem cells drive cancer progression, opening up the possibility of new treatments.

It is hoped that the insights into the dog population with also benefit people.

Speaking about the award, Prof Argyle said: “Cancer is a disease that has a devastating impact on both the dog and human populations and I am honoured that my work has enabled me to develop a greater understanding of how the disease develops and spreads.

“I am very proud that this work has been recognised and delighted that the money from the award will enable me to fund a postgraduate student to study the protein we have identified as causing the spread of cancer, enabling us to take this vital research to the next level.

“This will have huge implications not only for dogs, but potentially for humans as well, meaning that dogs really are a man’s best friend.”

Professor Argyle was awarded a £20,000 prize. The awards are run by the Kennel Club Charitable Trust.