Top vet to become life peer

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A LEADING animal health expert in Midlothian has been appointed to the House of Lords.

Professor Sandy Trees (pictured), chairman of Moredun Research Institute near Penicuik, becomes a life peer and will take a non-party-political role at Westminster.

He was appointed to the internationally-renowned institute at Pentlands Science Park last December after a long and distinguished career in general practice, industry and academia.

Professor Trees said: “I am thrilled, delighted and honoured to have been appointed to the House of Lords.

“I am particularly grateful to have had the unequivocal support of the British Veterinary Association and the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons throughout this process.

“I am hugely proud of what the veterinary profession does and I hope to further the recognition of its contribution to society.

“As an appointed crossbencher I am expected – and will try – to contribute to the work of parliament across a range of areas.

“Apart from veterinary matters, I have experience of science and technology in general, agriculture, international health development and tropical medicine, education, regulation, commerce, management, conservation and the environment.”

He qualified from Edinburgh’s Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies in 1969 and became a senior lecturer at the University of Liverpool in 1980.

He was appointed Head of the Parasite and Vector Biology Division and then made Dean of Liverpool’s Faculty of Veterinary Science, where he remained until his retirement in 2008.

Professor Trees has maintained an active interest in veterinary education, being president of the Association of Veterinary Teachers and Research Workers (1996 to 1997) and president of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons in 2009.

He has also been a council member of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, a founding diplomat of the European Veterinary Parasitology College and is an executive board member of the World Association for Veterinary Parasitology.

Professor Trees confirmed that he would continue his role at Moredun.

He commented: “As a working peer, it is important to maintain involvement with one’s professional activities, and the two roles will complement one another.”

Professor Julie Fitzpatrick, scientific director at the institute, added her congratulations: “I am delighted to learn of Professor Trees’ appointment to the House of Lords.

“This new role will allow him to bring his very considerable expertise and interest in veterinary and animal science to a wider audience.”