Cala Bursary boosts groups in Midlothian

Cala Homes Midlothian Bursary receipients 'Newbattle Beekeepers Association. Pictured are members 'Myriam Baete and Maggie Lyons. Photo by Ian Georgeson.
Cala Homes Midlothian Bursary receipients 'Newbattle Beekeepers Association. Pictured are members 'Myriam Baete and Maggie Lyons. Photo by Ian Georgeson.

Two groups helping communities are among the recipients of this year’s CALA Homes Bursary, in partnership with the Midlothian Advertiser.

After careful consideration from a selection panel, consisting of CALA staff and Midlothian Advertiser editor Janet Bee, the two groups, along with 11 other successful recipients, have been awarded a share of £10,000.

From men’s sheds to youth projects, this year’s scheme has awarded grants to a variety of good causes around the region. These two worthy causes below highlight some of the important work being done to preserve Midlothian’s landscape.

Esk Valley Trust was formed in April 2001 by groups of local people interested in the countryside of Midlothian and East Lothian. Their share of the bursary will help preserve the natural landscape from the river’s source near Carlops all the way to Musselburgh.

Ben Miller of Esk Valley Trust, said: “Our work involves campaigning to promote and preserve the Esk Rivers that run through Midlothian and East Lothian.

“One of our projects is to create a high-profile walking route right along the North Esk.

“This could particularly benefit the growing population of Midlothian and help to connect up the green corridor that runs through our different communities.

“It’s really great to get this grant from CALA as it’s going to help us to redevelop our website which is a bit tired, and bring new things onto it such as photo sharing and family friendly routes. We’re really grateful to CALA for the support.”

Newbattle Beekeepers Association also received CALA Bursary funding. The group’s secretary Helen Nelson said: “We are primarily a teaching association and offer a one-year beginner beekeeping course. We’re the only association in Scotland that does that.

“We can take up to 12 on the course and everything is done by volunteers and we have a top class teaching facility to be proud of. We can look at bees and diseases and also do video talks.

“We also use it for meetings but the challenge is the cost of the equipment and space.

“We want to make the public aware of the importance of honeybees to the eco-system. The funding from CALA will be vital for boosting our communication channels and training materials.”