Crime cash helps Mayfield project the Y2K

Cabinet Secretary for Justice Humza Yousaf visited the Y2K project in Mayfield to meet with young people from the 180 service which will benefit from the funding over the next 3 years 2020-23.
Cabinet Secretary for Justice Humza Yousaf visited the Y2K project in Mayfield to meet with young people from the 180 service which will benefit from the funding over the next 3 years 2020-23.

Cabinet Secretary for Justice Humza Yousaf visited the Y2K in Mayfield this week as the youth project received an undisclosed grant from the Cashback for Communities fund.

Y2K is just one of 24 projects nationwide, to have been awarded CashBack Phase 5 funding and Mr Yousaf visited the project to meet with young people from the 180 service which will benefit from the funding over the next three years. The Scottish Government will not reveal the figure awarded.

Y2K’s Youthwork co-ordinator, Lyndsey Ritchie, said: “We are absolutely delighted to be a new partner in the CashBack Phase 5 funding since support to address youth offending and anti-social behaviour has always been at the heart of our work.

“Development of our 180 service has been enhanced by previous phases of CashBack funding but news of an award under CashBack Phase 5 has given our project the best possible start to 2020.

“We can now plan ahead with the young people and community stakeholders in the knowledge that this service, the only one of its kind in the authority, has been secured for the next three years – a luxury in this challenging financial climate.”

The 180 project lead, Natalie Paris, said: “News of Y2K becoming partners in CashBack Phase 5 is so exciting! We firmly believe that early support and prevention work delivered through a whole community approach is essential for young people who are involved in offending or getting into risky behaviour.

“CashBack clearly recognises the need to invest in positive futures not just for our young people but for everyone in our communities.”

Mr Yousaf announced the launch of the £19 million fund and spent some time at the project chatting to the young people and taking part in one of the exercises used in the 180 programme to consider risks and consequences. There was also the opportunity for a bit of spray-painting.

Mr Yousaf said: “CashBack is a unique and potentially life-transforming programme that helps expand young people’s horizons and supports them to realise their ambitions and reach their full potential.

“This phase of CashBack has a particular focus on projects that support young people and communities most affected by crime. We are working hard to tackle the root causes of crime and disorder through early intervention and to ensure those affected have the support in place to steer them away from criminal or antisocial behaviour.”

Explaining why the amount awarded has not been revealed, a Scottish Government spokesperson said: “We are delighted to welcome the Y2K project as a new partner for the next Phase of our Cashback programme. We are working with all partners to finalise grant terms and conditions and we expect this to be completed shortly. Once this process is complete we will publish all individual grant award amounts.”