Repairs are planned at Rosslyn Castle

The current Rosslyn Castle building dates back to the 17th century, but the grounds dates back to the 14th century
The current Rosslyn Castle building dates back to the 17th century, but the grounds dates back to the 14th century

A bid to make crumbling stonework safe at an ancient castle a few minutes walk from historic Rosslyn Chapel safe has been launched.

Rosslyn Chapel Trust has applied for listed building consent to carry out work on what it described as the “ruinous part” of the east range of 14th century grounds of Rosslyn Castle.

The castle, which lies in woodlands in Roslin Glen, is used as luxury holiday accommodation popular with visitors to the chapel, which found global fame in the Da Vinci Code.

While the current castle dates back to early 17th, the ruins of its former fortifications date back to the 14th century.

Plans to carry out work to safeguard some of the older ruins have now been lodged with Midlothian Council.

The proposals include the “removal and/or consolidation and/or reinstatement of loose masonry to prevent further deterioration of the vulnerable or unstable masonry”.

The area where the work is planned is currently used as an enclosed garden by people staying at the castle.

Proposals also include removing a brick infill at the entrance to a tower to assess its condition internally and excavations to establish the location and condition of the original floor of the east range

The Rosslyn Estate has been the ancestral home of the St Clair family since 1070 and the castle, dating back to 1622, is described as a comfortable house set among the 14th century ruins of older fortifications.

Its website says the castle “still contains an element of drama – on one side a two storey building, on the other it drops five storeys, including the former kitchen, bakehouse and dungeon, down the side of the rock to reach the ground 60 feet below.”

Marie Sharp - Local Democracy Reporting Service